fbpx

During the entire month of February, talkSTEM will be kicking off its special #herSTEMlens campaign, part of its STEMlens photo and video exhibition, and we’d love for you to get involved! 

STEMlens encourages students and teachers to share unique photos that show how much more STEM is in their daily lives than they realize, in a fun and engaging way. Our goal is to impact at least 10,000 children, and we need your help. 

Share Your #herSTEMlens

Please share your #herSTEMlens as soon as possible so we can make sure to include in the virtual exhibition that we are putting together, freely accessible to all. We want to feature women who are leaders in a wide variety of STEM professions, women in STEM careers, and young girls.

Let’s share what we see, marvel at our questions about the mundane and the magical, and above all, let’s remember that every space is a STEM space and every girl is a STEM girl. 

To participate in the #herSTEMlens virtual exhibition, we invite you to do one of the following:

  1. Encourage girls to post their own #herSTEMlens by
    1. Capturing a personalized photo of how you see the world around you that inspires you to think about STEM
    2. Adding a question or idea that other girls and women can share and discussPosting your #herSTEMlens on Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, or Facebook.  Don’t forget to tag us so we can see your contribution, repost, and also include in the curated virtual exhibition.
  2. Or, simply share the included image to help spread the word! 
    1. Make sure to link your post to this blog post or add it to your Linktree for Instagram.
    2. Here’s a Tweetable message you can include:

During the entire month of February, @talkingSTEM will be kicking off its #herSTEMlens photo and video exhibition campaign to encourage her to share what she sees, and above all, remember that every space is a STEM space and every girl is a STEM girl. 

This special program will also nicely coincide with the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science Day on February 11th.   Stay tuned for information on the virtual #herSTEMlens gallery in the #STEMlens exhibition.

For more information, including some examples, visit https://talkstem.org/tiktok-here-we-come/.


About the talkSTEM Blog

The talkSTEM blog posts help to educate the public about the meaning of STEM and STEM education, in effect answering the question, “What does STEM mean in education“ or, simply put, “What is STEM learning?”. Today’s post was about our new #herSTEMlens campaign that aims to get more girls in STEM through a fun educational activity. You can support this and other STEM programming by donating today. talkSTEM works hard to make unique and high-quality STE(A)M educational content freely available to all children. Every dollar you contribute goes directly to our educational programming and content creation that reaches under-resourced student populations. Please support us.

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0

talkSTEM Contributor

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • There’s lots of material for this available from the https://www.ifthencollection.org/
    that would fit your need. It’s freely available for education and non-profit use.

  • Anjani Shah says:

    Maybe things have gotten worse, but when I was a kid, 40-50 years ago (I’m 54 years old), growing up in the 1970s, I never felt that I couldn’t be good in math or science just because I was a girl. Maybe it’s because my father was an engineer and said I had a brain and just needed to use it. He helped show me how fun math can be and showed me how logical it was — much simpler than understanding what other people are thinking! Another benefit is that you will always know if you were right or wrong. Science to me is also just an extension of questioning and clear, precise, logical thinking — the same skills are important for writing or anything you want to do in a rational way. Being good or at least not shying away from math or science will help you in no matter when you end up doing! I am now a science writer — earned a PhD in cell biology but always liked writing and learned a lot ‘as I went along’: by doing, reading and paying attention to the edits of my writing. You never stop learning.

About the Founder & CEO

Dr. Koshi Dhingra has dedicated her career to STEM education and is passionate about having every child live up to their potential. Seeing a lack of girls and other underrepresented youth in STEM programs, she founded talkSTEM in 2015 to address the imbalance. She has a doctorate in science education from Teachers College, Columbia University, has years of experience teaching in graduate and undergraduate programs, and has held leadership roles in universities. She advises and collaborates with a broad range of educational institutions globally. Dr. Dhingra began her career teaching science in middle and high school in New York. She lives in Dallas, Texas with her husband, three children, and two dogs.

Join Our Community

Please sign up to join our community and receive notifications about new content. We share perspectives of thought leaders in the STEM learning ecosystem as well as talkSTEM’s original content. It’s all designed to engage and inspire our youth and to grow strong STEM ecosystems everywhere!

#STEMlens